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Can You Learn to Drive with Glasses or Colour Blindness?

colour blindness

Learning to drive can be a challenging and exciting experience, but if you wear glasses or are colourblind, it can also present some additional hurdles. However, with some extra preparation and the right resources, you can feel confident and prepared for your driving lessons and tests.

 

According to the UK Government website, you are required to wear glasses or contact lenses for driving if you need them to meet the required standard for driving. This means that if you have a visual acuity of less than 6/12 (without glasses or contact lenses) in either or both eyes, or if you have a visual field of less than 120 degrees (with glasses or contact lenses), you will need to wear glasses or contact lenses while driving.

 

If you are colourblind, you will still be able to pass your driving test as long as your colour vision meets the required standard. 

 

The UK Government website states that ‘You must tell DVLA if you’ve got any problem with your eyesight that affects both of your eyes, or the remaining eye if you only have one eye.

This does not include being short or long sighted or colour blind. You also do not need to say if you’ve had surgery to correct short sightedness and can meet the eyesight standards.’

In order to prepare for your driving lessons and tests, it is important to make sure that you have the proper eyewear and that it is in good condition. 

 

This includes ensuring that your glasses or contact lenses are up to date and that you have a spare pair in case of an emergency. It is also a good idea to practise driving with your eyewear, so that you can become comfortable and confident with it.

 

If you are colourblind, there are a few additional steps you can take to prepare for your driving lessons and tests. One helpful resource is the “Colour Blind Awareness” website, which provides information and tips for individuals with colour vision deficiencies.

 

The website recommends practising identifying colours in different lighting conditions, using colour charts or apps, and getting familiar with the colours of common road signs and signals.

 

It is also a good idea to inform your driving instructor if you are colourblind, so that they can provide additional support and guidance during your lessons. Your instructor may also be able to provide you with additional resources or refer you to a specialist who can help you prepare for the colour vision test.

 

In conclusion, if you wear glasses or are colourblind, learning to drive in the UK can present some additional challenges. However, with the right resources and preparation, you can feel confident and prepared for your driving lessons and tests. 

 

Search the A to Z of medical conditions that could affect your driving here: https://www.gov.uk/health-conditions-and-driving to find out if you need to notify the DVLA about your eyesight problem.

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